Workshop

DNA Mixture Interpretation Principles and Best Practices

Thursday September 26th, 2019 // 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Early Registration (before July 15, 2019)$165
Standard Registration$185

Registration fees include lunch

Description:

In the process of working on a NIST Scientific Foundation Review on DNA mixture interpretation, our team gathered and studied the scientific literature on the topic and carefully considered principles and best practices. The report generated from our study will be discussed along with specific thoughts regarding case context and measurement and interpretation issues involving binary approaches and probabilistic genotyping.

 

Learning Outcomes:

  1. The literature and scientific foundations of DNA mixture interpretation
  2. Case context considerations in examining complex, low-level DNA mixtures
  3. Measurement uncertainty and reliability considerations for forensic mixture DNA interpretation involving binary approaches and probabilistic genotyping

 

Intended Audience:

DNA analysts and Technical Leaders

Speakers

John ButlerChair

NIST Fellow & Special Assistant to the Director at the National Institute of Standards and Technology

John M. Butler is an internationally recognized expert in forensic DNA analysis and holds a Ph.D. in analytical chemistry from the University of Virginia. He has written five textbooks on Forensic DNA Typing (2001, 2005, 2010, 2012, and 2015) and given hundreds of invited talks to scientists, lawyers, and members of the general public throughout the United States and in 25 other countries so far.

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Sheila Willis

Guest Researcher at National Institute of Standards and Technology

Sheila Willis was Director General Forensic Science Ireland from 2002 – 2017. From Sept 2017 to April 2019 she worked at NIST on a scientific foundation review of DNA mixture interpretation. She has given many presentations including “Forensic Science – Fact and Fiction” as a recipient of the Boyle Higgins Medal from the Institute of Chemistry of Ireland, 2013; Stuart Kind Memorial Lecture 2016 “What does it take to be a Skeptical Witness -can we learn from the past to plan the future? “and Forensics@NIST “Lessons learned from a life in Crime”.

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