Speaker

Mitch Holland

Associate Professor, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Eberly College of Science, Pennsylvania State University

Sessions Presenting

Submit Questions

Speaker

Mitch Holland

Associate Professor, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Eberly College of Science, Pennsylvania State University

Dr. Holland holds a B.S. in Chemistry from Hobart Collage, a Ph.D. in Biochemistry, and was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine where he studied Human Genetics.  He is a Fellow in the American Academy of Forensic Sciences, and has served as an associate professorial lecturer and adjunct faculty member at various colleges and universities.  Dr. Holland has been on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Forensic Sciences and a member of the Advisory Board of the International Journal of Legal Medicine.  He has held numerous positions on governmental and company advisory boards and has been recognized by the FBI and others for his work.

Prior to coming to Penn State in 2005 to help develop the Forensic Science program, Dr. Holland was the Senior Vice President of Operations and Laboratory Director of The Bode Technology Group.  At Bode, he led the efforts to produce DNA profiles from victim remains recovered from Ground Zero (World Trade Centers) following the terrorist attacks of 9/11.  From 1991-2000, he held various positions at the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory in Rockville, Md., including Scientific Laboratory Director from 1993-2000.  At AFDIL, Dr. Holland led the efforts to identify the remains of 1st Lt Michael Blassie (the Vietnam Unknown Soldier) and Nicholas Romanov, the last Russian Tsar.

Dr. Holland’s research group is focused on advancing forensic DNA applications.  Much of his research involves basic discovery in the area of mitochondrial (mt) DNA genetics; for example, leveraging the power of massively parallel sequencing (MPS) to measure rates of mtDNA heteroplasmy in different population groups, to evaluate the transmission of heteroplasmic variants between maternal relatives and tissue types, to assess the impact of damage on the interpretation of low-level heteroplasmic variants, and to develop software solutions for analysis of MPS data.